1. Overview

In this tutorial, we’ll look at the Lombok @AllArgsConstructor, @NoArgsConstructor, and @RequiredArgsConstructor annotations.

When we use these annotations, Lombok generates the constructors automatically for us.

2. @AllArgsConstructor For All Arguments Constructor

@AllArgsConstructor generates a constructor requiring an argument for every field in the annotated class.

So we have the Employee class with two fields:

@AllArgsConstructor
public class Employee {

    private String name;
    private int salary;
}

When we de-lombok the class, it becomes:

public class Employee {

    private String name;
    private int salary;

    public Employee(String name, int salary) {
        this.name = name;
        this.salary = salary;
    }
}

Here, Lombok generates a constructor requiring a value for all fields.

2.1. Static Factory Method for @AllArgsConstructor

@AllArgsContstructor also allows the creation of static factory methods using the staticName attribute:

@AllArgsConstructor(staticName = "of")
class Department {

    private String location;
    private String employeeNumber;
}

Consequently, Lombok makes the constructor private and then create a static factory method with the given name:

class Department {

    private String location;
    private String employeeNumber;

    private Department(String location, String employeeNumber) {
        this.location = location;
        this.employeeNumber = employeeNumber;
    }

    public static Department of(String location, String employeeNumber) {
        return new Department(location, employeeNumber);
    }
}

Here, the of method calls the private constructor.

3. @NoArgsConstructor For No Argument Constructor

@NoArgsConstructor generates a default constructor with no parameters.

We have the following Employee class:

@NoArgsConstructor
public class Employee {

    private String name;
    private int salary;
}

When we look at the generated code, we see that Lombok adds a no-args constructor:

public class Employee {

    private String name;
    private int salary;

    public Employee() {
    }
}

3.1. Static Factory Method for @NoArgsConstructor

Similar to @AllArgsConstructor, we can create a static factory method for construction purposes using the @NoArgsConstructor annotation:

@NoArgsConstructor(staticName = "of")
class Department {

    private String location;
    private String employeeNumber;
}

4. @RequiredArgsConstructor for Final and @NonNull Fields

@RequiredArgsConstructor generates a constructor requiring an argument for the final and @NonNull fields.

We have an Employee class which has one final field, name:

@RequiredArgsConstructor
public class Employee {

    private final String name;
    private int salary;
}

In the final generated code, Lombok creates a constructor expecting value for the name field:

public class Employee {

    private final String name;
    private int salary;

    public Employee(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

4.1. Static Factory Method for @RequiredArgsConstructor

We can also create a static factory method using @RequiredArgsConstructor:

@RequiredArgsConstructor(staticName = "of")
class Department {

    private final String location;
    private final String employeeNumber;
}

5. Calling the Super Constructor

Lombok can’t call the super constructor unless it is a no-args constructor.

We’ll start with the Citizen class:

public class Citizen {

    private String country;

    public Citizen(String country) {
        this.country = country;
    }
}

Note that Citizen doesn’t have a no-args constructor.

Then we’ll extend Citizen:

@AllArgsConstructor
public class Employee extends Citizen {

    private String name;
    private int salary;
}

Here, Employee extends Citizen and is annotated with @AllArgsConstructor. 

As a rule, Java requires subclasses to call one of the superclass constructors during construction. Since Citizen has only one constructor expecting a single argument, we must have a constructor in Employee calling it:

public Employee(String name, int salary, String country) {
    super(country);
    this.name = name;
    this.salary = salary;
}

This is one possible constructor. It defines parameters for country, name, and salary fields and then calls the super constructor. However, @AllArgsConstructor or other constructor annotations can’t generate a constructor similar to this. Because Lombok can’t call a super constructor that has arguments.

To conclude, if the superclass doesn’t have a no-args constructor, Lombok can’t generate any constructor in the subclass.

6. Conclusion

In this tutorial, we’ve investigated the @AllArgsConstructor, @NoArgsConstructor, and @RequiredArgsConstructor annotations that Lombok provides.

Finally, check out the source code for all examples in this tutorial over on Github.

Leave a Reply

Close Menu